Fast food nation a critique

And then there's the hamburger itself, which has traveled a long road from being ''a food for the poor'' at the start of the 20th century to the down-home meal of choice for capitalist royalty at the start of the 21st.

fast food nation quotes

This idea of going back to small-time capitalism defies the laws of capital accumulation—a big capitalist can outbid any small capitalist. Not to mention that he goes on to note that : Most of the high school students I met liked working at fast food restaurants.

Fast food nation food product design

He has the lanky build of a runner. He suggests stopping ads targeted at children, but then goes on to suggest that this will only happen when we, as individuals, decide to not buy anything from fast food places. It's also inexpensive and convenient. For example, the strategies fast food firms use when advertising to children. But in a larger sense, what ''Fast Food Nation'' criticizes is the very free-market enthusiasm that has made heroes of the burger fans Gates and Buffett, the latter of whom has famously been a major McDonald's shareholder. And on the whole so is ''Fast Food Nation. Ninety-six percent of American schoolchildren can identify Ronald McDonald. Turnover is huge, and the companies profit from it: Short-term workers accrue few benefits and are less likely to organize.

Nor was my fear allayed by this defensive sentence in the Introduction : I do not mean to suggest that fast food is solely responsible for every social problem now haunting the United States.

Or maybe that's the bad news. Among the mostly unskilled workforce, severe injuries are common.

Fast food nation update

The company is one of the country's top toy distributors and its largest private operator of playgrounds. Ah yes, Mr. The factory-like process that turns livestock into hamburgers -- which Schlosser describes in sometimes harrowing detail -- means that ''a single fast-food hamburger now contains meat from dozens or even hundreds of different cattle. Among the mostly unskilled workforce, severe injuries are common. This book will doubtlessly go down in history as the favorite palm book of the elitist, petty-bourgeois American social democrats and liberals. To see how this is handled today, Schlosser visits a ''fry factory'' in Idaho, watching as potatoes are washed and have their skins blown off by machines and are then fired through a Water Gun Knife -- a hose that shoots potatoes, at feet per second, through steel grillwork that cuts them into perfectly uniform fries. The meat-processing industry and restaurant chains continually lobby against regulations that would improve worker and food safety. I could care less that it is a big box store, and the fact that it sells every product for low prices is something positive for the working class. But the good news is that this isn't a frivolous book at all.

The factory-like process that turns livestock into hamburgers -- which Schlosser describes in sometimes harrowing detail -- means that ''a single fast-food hamburger now contains meat from dozens or even hundreds of different cattle.

After all, practically everyone in the country has at least dabbled in fast food at one time or another. By bringing the all-American concept of assembly-line production into the food industry, they started an industry that would be worth billions.

Fast food nation a critique

More recently, cattle raising and meatpacking have been industrialized just like the potato business, flavor science and fast-food outlets themselves. Ninety-six percent of American schoolchildren can identify Ronald McDonald. Schlosser says within these companies there are child psychologist that instructs them on what type of advertising will work at different stages of child development. At the very least, Schlosser makes it hard to go on eating fast food in blissful ignorance. The best point he makes is that : Nobody in the United States is forced to buy fast food. No one can honestly take issue with his point that the fat content in fast food is ridiculously high, and that the enormity of portions is unnecessary. More deeply, Eric Schlosser falls for the capitalist trap of bourgeois culture-beauty instead of truth, or in his case ugliness instead of truth. The experience enraged and appalled him. Three companies grow and process about 80 percent of all French fries now served by fast food chains.

And other companies saw that they could have the same sort of work force, a work force that received little pay and no benefits. Chip in what you can. And why not? No one can honestly take issue with his point that the fat content in fast food is ridiculously high, and that the enormity of portions is unnecessary.

Eric Schlosser is going to tell you anyway. It does, however, enable the reader to better understand what goes on behind the scenes to get that Big Mac or Whopper into your hands.

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The Hamburger Critic (and His Own Critics)